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Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)
between house speaker boehner and president obama. with stephen moore of the "wall street journal" and later the author of "columbine" and what we have learned from that tragedy and how it applies to the shooting in connecticut. >> i called on congress today to act immediately on what is appropriate to put armed police officers in every single school in this nation. [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] >> the headline in this morning's baltimore sun reflects those across the country. from the tribune's washington magazine, it's said when he weight in friday he delivered a lashing speech that included violent movies and video games as he said his plan would train those to guard our schools. in this edition of today's program, we're going to begin the first 45 minutes of the program to talk about the nra's response to the shootings. they broke their silence yesterday with executive director and vice president wayne. we'll talk more about what he had to say. but we want to get you involved in the conversation
. the goose is getting fat. >> plus, go on. >> south carolina senator jim demint is dequitting. >> run stephen, run. >> you want somebody young, conservative, from south carolina. maybe who has super pac pointing -- wait a second. ♪ >> thank goodness it's friday and it's a busy one at that. we have breaking news. within the last hour, the supreme court has announced that it will for the first time take up appeals on same-sex marriage. hearing cases on the defense of marriage act and california's proposition 8. much more on that in a moment, and the busy week ends with some good news for america's workers and the president. a little christmas cheer some early. the u.s. economy generating a stronger than expected 146,000 new jobs in november helping trim the jobless rate to 7.7%. a four-year low. happy holidays, right? not if you're john boehner. >> this isn't a progress report because there is no progress to report. the president has adopted a deliberate strategy to slow walk our economy right to the edge of the fiscal cliff. >> yes, indeed, it's like a visit from the ghost of christmas past,
below, my name is stephen and i have military affiliation. i would like to ask a question that is outside the box. but everything that you are all saying, sort of assumes that there should be some type administered ivy university for the academic achievement, and i would like to throw out to you the idea that every other service provided in our society was to be at that price. therefore when the people who most needed it would determine that they are willing to pay the price for the best education. in fact, a lot of times you have brilliant people who have known me to go to university, and they are going to get very little out of it. and it may be the weakest student gets the most out of the education. my question to you is why is this in any discussion, what i have just said of affirmative action or education? is pretty clear that the customers and the situation are really not customers, the beneficiaries were the customers. >> part of that should be directed to alan. do you get your moneys worth out of higher education today we met. >> if they come to my classes, they de
this negotiation. >> stephen, may i throw one other issue into the mix? >> but you're also going to get steep -- just read what the left is saying. they're say oh my god, with un100,000 teachers are going to lose their job, nurses are going to lose their job. >> and republicans are fine with that that's what you want. >> we wanted to cut the program for 20 years. >> the gop brand, because i think the net net of what has gone on in the last 24 hours does not bode well for the party. i add to that mix the statements that were made by lane lapierre earlier today. you may say michael, what's that got to do with the fiscal cliff? i think there is an association that many people have in their mind between the nra and the republican party. obviously, the nra more supportive of gop candidates, by and large, than democratic candidates. and the statement he made today about arming someone in every school i think is out of the mainstream. aren't these all related problems that people are perceiving the republicans as being out of sync, way too conservative? >> i think that what president obama has tried
senator lindsey graham. he never saw demint's resignation coming. >>> perhaps stephen colbert has his eye on demint's senate seat. a stephen colbert for senate twitter account popped up shortly after demint's announ announcement yesterday. the first tweet was reporting for duty, south carolina. the twitter handle has 1,500 followers. colbert was raised in charleston, south carolina. the state's governor will name demint's successor, but a special election will be held in 2014 for the seat. i think, if he actually ran for that seat, he'd have a good chance of winning some votes. >> it's hard to know if he's serious or if it's a joke. >> i don't know. he's got a pretty good gig going. >>> we're coming up on 5:21 now. time to get a check of weather and traffic on the ones. you're going to need the coat and also the umbrella. >> many good morning. >>> it's finally here, everybody, friday. temperatures in the mid and upper 30s. keeping a close eye on the friday morning temperatures. for now everything comfortably above the freezing mark. light raindrops coming in from the south of town, route
this hour interviewing a man. right now, we have with us mike from national public radio, neera, stephen barton, survivor of the aurora, colorado movie theater shooting, now a gun control advocate. we were talking before the break about the idea of the proprietary of talking guns in the wake of a gun tragedy. for the last decade or so, it's where the gun control has been. once in awhile, there's a horrific tragedy. someone says we should have gun control and then a discussion of whether we should have gun control. it wasn't that long ago when gun control was a political debate. featured prominently in national campaigns and statewide campaigns. i want to talk about what it was like back then. the best way to kick it off, there's an extraordinary clip in hind site from 19 years ago to the day. there was a railroad, maybe you remember it all. the day after that, bill clinton talked to the press. he's president of the united states, i look at this and say i can't imagine barack obama or any politician doing this. >> the gun that was used contained two 15-round clips. this man in a manic sta
of the crisis in libya, and the attack in benghazi that killed ambassador chris stephens. >> i didn't want to see a confirmation process that was very prolonged, very politicized, very distracting, and very disruptive. because there are so many things we need to get done as a country. >> massachusetts senator john kerry and former republican senator chuck hagel of nebraska are now considered the front-runners to replace hillary clinton when she officially steps down. >>> in oregon, the shopping mall that became the scene of a deadly shooting rampage days ago is set to reopen this morning. a candlelight vigil for the victims will be held tonight. two people were killed and the 15-year-old girl was wounded when 22-year-old jacob roberts opened fire inside the clackamas town center on tuesday. roberts then killed himself. there is still no motive for the shooting. >>> a much calmer day is in store for san diego after a pounding rainstorm drenched that city. the rain came down so fast and furious, in fact, it flooded businesses and major intersections, leaving drivers stranded in the road. som
on what is already a fragile economic recovery. stephen moore joins us. when economic growth was comparatively pretty good, this the president said no, now you don't want to raise tax rates because the economy is fragile. gdp is worse now, is that? >> i think almost exactly two years ago, the president said the economy is too fragile to raise taxes on anyone. so what you have essentially was a deal that was put together. remember back in december of 2010 when we were facing a very similar situation where they agreed to extend all the tax cuts for two years. by the way, that is why we are facing this new fiscal cliff. it is infuriating to business owners. i have been talking to a lot of them last couple of weeks. this is banana republic type of politics. no one knows what it will look like. it makes it impossible for businesses to do planning, purchasing equipment, hiring workers. you are seeing the impact on the stock market already where we have a lousy 10 days with stocks because everybody is in this kind of state of fear and trepidation that we are going to go over this cl
movement. >>> perhaps stephen colbert has his eyes on the senate seat. a colbert for senate twitter account popped up. the first tweet, ready for duty, south carolina. colbert was raised in charleston, south carolina. >>> new today, the white house just announced vice president joe biden will reach out to some people who could be hurt the most if we plunge off the fiscal cliff. he'll have lunch with a group of middle class americans. their taxes could sky rocket if congress and budget by the end of the year. the white house has highlighted several middle l class famili familiar -- families' struggles in making a case for the deal. >>> cnbc's kayla is live with that and more. good morning. >> good morning, eun. >>> investors are waiting that big economic report of the day. the november jobs report due out before the opening bell, and hurricane sandy is expected to have made a big dent last month as the storm slammed into the east coast. forecast called for just 80,000 jobs to have been added to payrolls. that's versus 171,000 in october. that would be the smallest growth in five months. snap
,000. nor another 330,000, another $320,000. and finally stewart stephens who was the chief strategist for the campaign has a little company that was paid -- okay? for the tellevision advertising, $173 million. now, that goes off into t.v. advertising, but the point is stewart stephens in addition to his salary gets 15% of that. >> whoa. >> for being the conduit for the ad. so, you know, >> peter: in addition to his salary? >> bill: right. so the whole picture to me sayssays a couple of things. first of all, about military romney ain't the good businessman that we thought he was. right? he was certainly not on the top of the way they were spending money. the other thing it says about these campaign consult ants i think it is important for us to recognize recognize. they are in it for the money. they are not in it out of loyalty to the candidate. they are not in it because they believe in the cause. they are in it for the money. it's not first case. i have known other people like this who run losing campaigns and make so much money they never have t
would be numbering in the 10s 220s, not the thousands. as i look at guys like stephen jackson and even guys like ryan clark, those are guys who i think do do it the right way when it comes to teaching their youth football people. i agree with you 100% on the idea of p.s. as for those things i would love to have a little bit of good news coming out about some of the players do you never hear about because they don't drive their car at 1,000 miles an hour or get advice at clubs or throw people out windows. unfortunately those are the stories we never hear and a good thing about our job is once the tv is off, the greatest psas we could possibly do, and i am putting this responsibility on us and the head of the communications department for us to tell those stories because we have thousands of great ones and for the guys you played with, those guys on your team, more often than not those are the very guys you would trust to play football and that is the stories we need to year. >> if i could jump in real quick. i will be brief. you make a good point. the story you got that leads to further
, he's got me. host: stephen, who did you vote for in 2008? in 2012.ean caller: i voted for president obama. i really liked mitt romney. why do i have to pay less taxes than my friend from massachusetts? that really bugged me. host: that is stephen from connecticut. tyrone is a republican from the bronx. caller: i think hillary clinton would be an excellent candidate in 2016. i think she handled the middle eastern issue to the best of her ability. also, as far as the gop is concerned, i think she has made strides toward eliminating the tax spending through various commitments with private entities and organizations that are coming out of the woodwork. i was watching earlier today and what they were requesting from the white house was let's fix this problem by incorporating a small businesses and less government intervention to curb the deficit. it has been astronomical. then i heard barack obama say the way we are going to do it is by making more cuts in various ways. he was saying by making more cuts and the only people it is going to hurt is the working class and somewhat of the mid
interesting to see those political documents falling after his name. host: stephen, thank you so much. we have been talking this morning about the shooting on friday in connecticut. president obama will be headed to new town this evening. he will be attending a memorial service and he will speak at an interfaith vigil for the families and the victims. he will be meeting with the families and he will be thanking the first responders. all of that this evening on c- span. we will be right here. something else that we are doing right now this holiday season is looking at the chaplains who work in the building behind us in the u.s. capitol. you can find more information about this on our facebook page. you will be able to see who these people are, their biographies, and you will be able to learn more information about them. coming up next, we will be learning more about the so- called fiscal cliff. later on, the president of dreamworks will talk to us about the future of the tree -- the tea party. >> coming up later, we will vieira network tv talk shows on c-span radio. the focus on all of those sh
the america's financial future. here is stephen ohlemacher. thank you for being here. how many people in america receive social security? >> a little bit more than 56 million people get social security. the average benefit is a little over $1,200 a month. so maybe it is like $13,000, $14,000 a year. >> we're talking about retirees but also the disabled. >> yes, fairly wide group of people get social security benefits, retired workers, spouses, children, disabled workers, widows, widowers. it is a fairly big social safety net of people who get social security benefits. >> as you mentioned about 56 million the retirees received a $1,2 a month. there is also the s.s.i. about $500 a month. how does social security get financed? >> it has been a self funded program. it is funded by payroll taxes. there's a 12.4% tax on wages up to about $110,000. you make more than that then any money you make over that is not taxed for social security. it is divided equally between your employer and the worker. for the past two years, the workers share has been reduced. that has saved, by the way, if you
in massachusetts. he ran against scott brown and loss. congressman stephen lynch. name out of contention is ted kennedy, jr. he will not seek the seat. he was speculated to seek the seat of his late father. the decision to buck the dying inouye. senator daniel in a the swearing-in took place yesterday with joe biden. brian schatz becomes the senior senator with the new congress being formed on january the third. on the independent line -- jack on the independent line. caller: good morning. i bet a co-worker that we are going over the fiscal cliff. it is more of a slope than a cliff. it would be a year of complete in activity before we would see the real bite of everything, all of the doom that is being forecasted. i am reminded of erskine bowles and alan simpson. about three weeks ago or four weeks ago, they met with the president and members of congress and discuss their feelings afterwards with the press. erskine bowles said he felt there was a third of a chance that there would be a deal and a third of a chance no deal and a third there would be no deal until after we went past the january 1
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.a. and j.d. from yale and serves as an editor for the yale law's journal. after clerking for stephen breyer when he was judge of the u.s. court of appeals for the first circuit professor amar joined the faculty of yale in 1985. professor amar is a coeditor of the leading constitutional law casebook, decision-decision- making and is th author of several other books including the constitution and criminal procedure, the bill of rights creation and reconstruction, america's constitution a biography and most recently america's unwritten constitution, the president's and decibels we live by. the honorable clarence thomas has served as an associate justice of the supreme court of the united states for nearly 21 years. he attended conceptual cemetery and received an a.b. from the college of the holy cross and his j.d. from yale law school. he served as an assistant attorney general of missouri from 1974 to 1977, an attorney with the monsanto company from 77 to 79 and legislative assistant to senator john danforth from 1979 to 1981. from 1981 to 1982 he served as assistant secretary for civil right
. >>> a large crowd cheers the first couple to get married under maine's new same-sex marriage law. stephen bridges and michael snell of port land tied the knot just after midnight this morning. >> it's very surreal still. we didn't expect all the cameras and everything tonight. >> we finally feel equal and happy to live in maine. >> it's official now. after nine years, it's all good. >> yeah. >> voters in maine and maryland approved same-sex marriage in november. >>> don wright is not going to let a little thing like cancer keep from his goal running a marathon in every state. he's well on which is way to achieving that goal. he's an unusual patient in another way experimenting with a new approach to his disease. here's dr. sanjay gupta with today's "human factor." >> don's career spanned engineering, being a company vice president and the law. and at age 62, he discovered a new passion. marathons. eight years ago, just days after running his first 26-mile race though, he got some devastating news. >> i had gone to the doctor a couple of times for pain in my back. it was multiple myeloma.
page, stephen moore. he's out with a new book "who's the fairest of them all. the truth about opportunity, taxes and wealth in america." first of all, fiscal cliff, are you hopeful and does it sound like what they're close to might be fair? >> it depends on -- this is such a moving target in terms of what the final negotiations will be. i always predicted near midnight december 24 or december 31 they will reach a deal. the question is whether it will be something good for the economy and something i had in my book, does it really make sense to be raising tax rates when we have a high unemployment rate. one of the point i make in the book the fairest system of them all would be a flat tax, something steve forbes talks about in the 1990s keeps rates low and broadens the base and makes everybody pay their fair share. >> let's go to the book, in fairness, one of the arguments you make is that the president wants to make everybody poor. is that fair? >> well, i don't know if he wants to make everyone poor but -- >> equally poor. >> let me put it like this. a good tax system tries t
frightening stephen king novel. it was just a nightmare. >> the word i kept hearing from people who lived there was "violation." this was such a bubble, such a little corner of connecticut, such a safe place for them. and to have this kind of thing visited upon them, to have this man come in and shatter their world, not just their town, but their world. there is a woman who lives two houses away from the school. her children are older now but went to sandy hook elementary, cut through the back woods to go through. she talked about driving through that parking lot, about going to all her son's baseball games at that school. all she said she ever heard was the sound of laughter coming through the woods. and to hear now the sounds of sirens on that friday afternoon, she says things will never be the same. there's a dark cloud over her town. the name newtown and sandy hook will forever be associated with this tragedy. she believes they have to level the school immediately and raise some kind of memorial there. this town is shaken and will be forever. >> the initial shock of what happened and
the fiscal cliff. or of course the end of the world. here's what stephen colbert and jay leno had to say. >> it's a special time of the year. would he have been looking forward to it for months now. everywhere you can go you can seat twinkle in little children's eyes because they know that in just a few short weeks, the fiscal cliff is coming to town. merry clifmas. and with a dramatic name like fiscal cliff, it's got to be exciting. >> the president is asking for 1.6 trillion in revenue. >> $600 billion in tax hikes. >> entitlement reform. >> dividends and capital gains. >> discretionary spending. >> i'm up. what happened? is it over? >> as you know, the myans have predicted the world is supposed to end is on december 21st or as lakers fans feel about it, can't get here fast enough. i was thinking, you know, if the word doesn't end on december 21st, you can bet the next day the malls will be overrun with mayans trying to buy last minute gifts. >> all right. early start continues right now. >>> chaos at the mall. a gunman kills two before taking his own life in front of horrified shopper
it is involved in the discussions, the negotiations over america's financial future, is stephen ohlemacher, joining us from the associated press, where he is a reporter. how much social security do people get? guest: a little more than 66 million people. the average benefit is a little over $12,000 -- a little over $1,200 a month. maybe $13,000 a year or so. host: we are talking about retirees and the disabled. guest: a fairly wide group of people receive social security benefits. retired workers, spouses, children, disabled workers, widows, widowers. a big safety net of people. host: retirees receive about $1,200 a month on average. the benefits for the disabled, $1,100 a month on average. how does social security get financed? guest: it has been a self-funded program since its inception. it is funded by payroll taxes. there's a 12.4% tax on wages up to about $110,000. if you make more than that, any money you make over that is not taxed as part of social security. the tax is divided equally between your employer and the worker. for the past two years, the workers' share of 6.2% has been
tax hike if we don't act. for weeks stephen has been trying to get the president to come up with a fair, reasonable and balanced solution so we don't go over the cliff. the president thinking he has some sort of a mandate after his reelection has been less than reasonable. in fact, this president has proposed more and more spending and more and more tax hikes in his proposals to the spreerk while the spreerk is -- speaker to is trying to deal with our $16 trillion debt, now $16.4 trillion. the president just can't take yes for an answer. he must think if he keeps slow walking these proposals, the republicans will get the blame and members of his administration have even revealed that they would be more than happy if we went over the cliff. what kind of cruel christmas gift is that? after the speaker and the president exchanged offers this week, house republicans are looking at having votes on two competing pieces of legislation as early as tomorrow. the first is legislation that passed this body over the summer, deeply flawed legislation that every democrat in this body supp
would you feel? >> just on the j.f.k. assasination thing. i just read one of stephen king's new books which is about the assasination and a man who has the ability to go back in time and tries to stop the assasination of j.f.k. does that mean we should put a thing on the front and say this didn't happen? at what point is it someone's responsibility to find out whether there is a backing up of that argument. it seems ridiculous when it's about time travel because there is no time travel yet. to a lot of people that would be absurd, where is that line? it's a gray area. >> i think the answer to somebody who will look at -- watch "24" and say see didn't i tell you americans are torture amongers. it goes to the old question of what is the effect, what's the cause and what's the effect of art and on public perception and behavior. would i personally feel responsible? i thought about it and i do think we all bear some responsibility but not complete responsibility. so somebody who doesn't have a critical capacity to turn on a television and realize this is fiction, this is not a representat
and stephen breyer are frequently mistaken for each other. if you know what they look like they don't look anything alike. but people only have a vague sense and one time not too long ago, justice souter was driving from washington to his home in new hampshire. he stopped at a restaurant to get something to eat. and the couple came up to him and the guy said, you are on the supreme court, right? and he said, you are stephen breyer, and he didn't want to be embarrassed in front of his wife, so we said yes, i am stephen breyer, i am stephen breyer, and then they chatted for a little while and the guy said, what is the best thing about being on the supreme court? and he thought for a minute and he said, i would have to save take the privilege of serving with david souter. [laughter] how could you not love a guy like that. so i'm taking nominations for my favorite justice. okay, let's talk about the current supreme court by the numbers. well, there are six men and three women. first time in history there are three women in court. [applause] there are six catholics and three jews. no applause f
Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)